Bwana Charles, boys go find Chief..

As our procession entered the village, Makali was walking ahead with the three boys. The boys continued into the village. Malkali waited for us to catch up.

“Bwana Charles, boys go find Chief,” Makali said.

“Ok, let’s all ride to the edge of the village, dismount, and walk the rest of the way,” I said. 

 

I led the formation until we reached the first hut. Makali was there first and held my horse as I dismounted. Stan, Bryce, and Alan dismounted and stood by their horses. The camel handlers and Benga waited outside the village. The three Samburu boys held our horses as Makali and the four of us walked the last 30 yards to the center of the village. This village had 8 manyattas and one large enclosure in the center to hold their cattle.

Samburu men and women dress in brightly colored traditional shukas, which they wrap loosely around their bodies. Samburu men also dye their hair with red ochre, while the women adorn themselves in beautiful, multi-beaded necklaces and other traditional jewelry. Samburu warriors, or morans, keep their long hair in braids and dress in more colorful attire than other members of the tribe.

The Samburu tribe speaks the maa language, as do the Masai. However, although they share a vocabulary, the Samburu speak more rapidly than the Masai.

I have learned a fair amount of maa from Makali, but I can’t understand full speed maa. The Chief does speak some english, he certainly prefers maa. The gathering of information and translation would be Makali’s job.

As the chief approached, he was wearing a bright red shukas and ceremonial beads. He was carrying a magnificent walking stick carved of wood and ivory.

Bryce and I walked with Makali to meet the Chief as he approached..

 

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One Comment

  1. Good description of Samburu, they and the Masaii are a wonderfully colored people. The colors they wear and decorate with are gorgeous. LOVE the story……….

    Reply

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